Tag Archive: Kenya Biodiversity

The Water Efficient Maize for Africa (WEMA) project: Real or false solution to climate change?

By Lim Li Ching, Senior Researcher, Third World Network

Climate change is an urgent challenge facing farmers in Africa. As our world warms, many farmers are already experiencing devastating consequences, including storms, drought, floods, heat waves and extreme weather events. The implications for food security are severe, with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) projecting that wheat, rice and maize production will be negatively impacted by local temperature increases of 2°C or more above levels in the late twentieth century. Coupled with a predicted reduction in renewable surface water and groundwater resources in most dry subtropical regions, the prospects for agriculture are grim and extremely worrying.

Into this context enters the Water Efficient Maize for Africa (WEMA) project. The objective of the WEMA project is to produce drought-tolerant and insect-protected maize varieties, both conventional and genetically modified (GM). According to its proponents, these varieties “will provide valuable economic, agronomic and environmental1 benefits to millions of farmers by helping them produce more reliable harvests under moderate drought conditions and better grain quality due to reduced insect damage. This will help farmers harvest enough to feed their families, a surplus which they can sell to increase their incomes, and help strengthen

Scottish Parliament Motion on GM entry refusal, Kenya, South Africa

*S3M-6119 Bill Wilson: Biodiversity Coalition Opposes GM Contamination. That the Parliament notes reports that 40,000 tons of genetically modified (GM) maize from South Africa have been refused entry to Kenya as a result of protests led by the Kenya Biodiversity
Coalition;

Further notes, with reference to motion S3M-05873 by Bill Wilson.

Who Benefits from GM Crops and Large-scale Agribusiness?, that Monsanto, widely condemned for what are considered to be its unscrupulous practices, is reportedly responsible for three of the four varieties of maize in the shipment; agrees with the reported comments of Mariam Mayet of the African Centre for Biosafety that South Africa‘s decision to permit the export was irresponsible and that it appears that South Africa is being used as a springboard to contaminate the rest of the African continent by allowing multinationals to export from South African soil; is troubled by the South African Government’s apparent flouting of the provisions of the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety; disagrees strongly with the implication of a statement by the chairman of the South African parliamentary committee on agriculture, forestry and fisheries, Mlungisi Johnson, that GM crops enhance food security, and calls on the Kenyan