Tag Archive: Green Revolution

GMOs in Africa: Food and Agriculture. Status Report 2007

The African Centre for Biosafety has the pleasure of launching our new book titled GMOs in Africa: food and agriculture: Status report 2007. This booklet is the 4th in our Biosafety, Biopolitics and Biopiracy Series.

ISBN: 978-0-620-40099-2

By: Shenaz Moola and Victor Munnik
Edited by: Mariam Mayet and Rose Williams
Layout and design by: Lesley Lewis, inkspots@iafrica.com

Acknowledgements: This publication has been made possible as a result of the combined support of EED, HIVOS and NORAD. The ACB also extends its gratitude to Stephen Greenberg for his early research contributions.

About the Book:

The book provides an overview of the current status of genetic engineering using transgenic techniques in Africa‘s agriculture and food systems. It provides a synopsis of the current situation in Africa, an analysis of the key issues and trends, regional overviews and country by country status reports.

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Displacing Africa’s indigenous food

The African Centre for Biosafety has the pleasure of launching our new book titled GMOs in Africa: food and agriculture: Status report 2007. This booklet is the 4th in our Biosafety, Biopolitics and Biopiracy Series.

ISBN: 978-0-620-40099-2

By: Shenaz Moola and Victor Munnik
Edited by: Mariam Mayet and Rose Williams
Layout and design by: Lesley Lewis, inkspots@iafrica.com

Acknowledgements: This publication has been made possible as a result of the combined support of EED, HIVOS and NORAD. The ACB also extends its gratitude to Stephen Greenberg for his early research contributions.

About the Book:

The book provides an overview of the current status of genetic engineering using transgenic techniques in Africa‘s agriculture and food systems. It provides a synopsis of the current situation in Africa, an analysis of the key issues and trends, regional overviews and country by country status reports.

read more

Unmasking the New Green revolution in Africa

THIRD WORLD NETWORK
http://www.twnside.org.sg

UNMASKING THE NEW GREEN REVOLUTION IN AFRICA
Motives, Players and Dynamics

By Elenita C. Dano
Publisher: Third World Network (TWN), Church Development Service (EED) and African Centre for Biosafety
ISBN: 978-983-2729-08-2
Year: 2007 No. of pages: 68

About the Book

Efforts are currently underway to spark a ‘New Green Revolution‘ in African agriculture. Modelled on the original Green Revolution which began in Asia some five decades ago, this ambitious project entails the large-scale application of a technological package comprising new seed varieties, often including genetically modified crops, industrial farm inputs and massive agricultural infrastructure.

This paper looks at the major players behind this push for an African Green Revolution – a high-powered mix of Western Philanthropic organizations, agribusiness corporations, intergovernmental institutions and other groups – and traces the links and interconnected relationships between them. The paper also asks whether this grand scheme, which purports to be chiefly concerned with agricultural development in Africa, might not end up providing a cover for narrow corporate interests. The real solution to the problems facing African agriculture, the author argues, lies not with such externally imposed initiatives but in the hands of African farmers and smallholders themselves, who

Rural Communities Express Dismay: “land grabs” fuelled by Biofuels Strategy

More than sixty people met in Durban on March 5th 2007, to discuss the South African government’s Draft Industrial Biofuels Strategy, which is open for public comment until the end of March. The undersigned NGOs, individuals, farmer organisations and rural communities from KwaZulu-Natal, Eastern Cape, Limpopo and Mpumalanga who attended the workshop, express our extreme disquiet and consternation with the strategy.

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New Green Revolution for Africa: Trojan Horse for GMOs

After more than 10 years of genetically modified (GM) crop plants being grown in the world, only South Africa out of 53 countries on the African continent have commercial plantings of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). 9 countries, Burkina Faso; Egypt; Kenya; Morocco; Senegal; South Africa; Tanzania; Zambia; Zimbabwe have reported field trials of GMOs, while Uganda recently announced that field trials involving GM sweet
bananas would commence during May 2007. 1 20 African countries (Benin; Burkina Faso; Cameroon; Egypt; Ghana; Kenya; Malawi; Mali; Mauritius; Morocco; Namibia; Niger; Nigeria; Senegal; South Africa; Tanzania; Tunisia; Uganda; Zambia; Zimbabwe) are engaged in GMO research and development. At least 24 countries (Algeria; Benin; Botswana; Burkina Faso; Cameroon; Egypt; Ethiopia; Ghana; Kenya; Madagascar; Malawi; Mali; Mauritius; Morocco; Namibia; Niger; Nigeria; Senegal; South Africa; Tanzania; Tunisia; Uganda; Zambia; Zimbabwe) have the capacity and institutions to conduct research and development into agricultural biotechnology.

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Trojan Horse for GMOs

After more than 10 years of genetically modified (GM) crop plants being grown in the world, only South Africa out of 53 countries on the African continent have commercial plantings of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). 9 countries, Burkina Faso; Egypt; Kenya; Morocco; Senegal; South Africa; Tanzania; Zambia; Zimbabwe have reported field trials of GMOs, while Uganda recently announced that field trials involving GM sweet bananas would commence during May 2007. 20 African countries (Benin; Burkina Faso; Cameroon; Egypt; Ghana; Kenya; Malawi; Mali; Mauritius; Morocco; Namibia; Niger; Nigeria; Senegal; South Africa; Tanzania; Tunisia; Uganda; Zambia; Zimbabwe) are engaged in GMO research and development. At least 24 countries (Algeria; Benin; Botswana; Burkina Faso; Cameroon; Egypt; Ethiopia; Ghana; Kenya; Madagascar; Malawi; Mali; Mauritius; Morocco; Namibia; Niger; Nigeria; Senegal; South Africa; Tanzania; Tunisia; Uganda; Zambia; Zimbabwe) have the capacity and institutions to conduct research and development into agricultural biotechnology.

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Opening Pandora’s box: GMOs, Fuelish Paradigms and South Africa’s Biofuels Strategy

Towards the end of 2006, the South African Cabinet approved a ?Draft Biofuels Industry Strategy? 3 (?Biofuels Strategy?), where after, the document was released for public comment.

The Biofuels Strategy is supported by a feasibility study, 4 and read together, these documents propose the establishment of a biofuels industry with E8 and B2 blend targets based on bioethanol from maize and sugarcane, and biodiesel from soyabeans and sunflower seeds respectively. We are told that E8 and B2 level of biofuel production equates to 75% of the 2013 Renewable Energy target, and represents 4.5% of total liquid fuel use.

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Monsanto’s Seed of Hope Campaign

The African Centre for Biosafety offers this briefing paper to you, titled “Monsanto‘s Seed of Hope Campaign in South Africa.”

In the briefing, we offer information about Monsanto‘s Seed of Hope Campaign in the Eastern Cape-the poorest of South Africa‘s nine provinces, where Monsanto’s project was subsidised with huge chunks of public funds, which enabled it to penetrate extremely impoverished communities- first by introducing a Green Revolution type package as an important precursor to the introduction of its GM maize seeds, ably assisted by Bayer Cropscience, amongst other players.

During September 2006, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Rockefeller Foundation announced a donation of $150 million to contribute to a ?Second Green Revolution? in Africa to alleviate poverty and hunger. The money will be used, amongst other things, to promote technology packages for small-scale farmers containing fertilizer and new seeds. The aims of this new Green Revolution for Africa are very similar to Monsanto’s Seeds of hope campaign and are likely to benefit the seed and fertilizer industries, while having negligible impacts on total food production and further marginalizing African rural areas.

The South African government has a close and intimiate

African Agriculture under genetic engineering onslaught

Genetic engineering has made rapid entry into agriculture in the United States, Argentina, Canada, Brazil and South Africa, with these countries accounting for 99% of genetically modified (GM) crops grown globally. Now we are witnessing aggressive attempts, especially by the United States through its agency for international development (USAID) and its genetic engineering industry, to impose GM crops upon Africa under the guise of addressing food security, environmental stress and fighting poverty.

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