The ACB is committed to dismantling inequalities in the food and agriculture systems in Africa and the promotion of agro-ecology and food sovereignty.

Pioneer Hi-Bred, Dow Agrosciences wants SA to approve risky GM maize

During January 2005, Pioneer Hi-Bred RSA (Pty) Ltd and Dow Agrosciences Southern Africa (Pty) Ltd applied to the Executive Council and the Registrar: GMO Act, for a food and feed safety approval for its GM maize HerculexT RW. This GM maize variety is not currently grown commercially anywhere in the world; and is under investigation in the USA by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) because of food safety concerns.

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Sugarcane with a bacteriozide protein & Bt-Sugarcane / SARSI

Sugarcane with a bacteriozide protein & Bt-Sugarcane / SARSI

SUBMISSION OF OBJECTIONS BY THE AFRICAN CENTRE FOR BIOSAFETY (ACB)

Objections to the Applications made by the South African Sugar Research Institute (SASRI) in Respect of Permits for Activities with GMOs, Specifically Sugarcane, to the National Department of Agriculture in South Africa
African Centre for Biosafety, February 2005

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PRESS RELEASE: Bayer, Monsanto vie for South Africa‘s Sugar Cane
African Centre for Biosafety & Earthlife Africa, Ethekwini Branch, 18 February 2005

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OVERVIEW

A legal and scientific assessment was made of the information obtained from the National Department of Agriculture in terms of the Public Access to Information Act (PAIA). The legal objections centre around concerns that that Bayer Cropscience is bankrolling the South African Association-Sugarcane Research Institute field trials and hopes to make inroads here because lax biosafety legislation and political climate that favours the interests of multinational corporations. The EC has a statutory duty to protect the environment and not promote the interests of gene giants. The information supplied by the applicant is very scant does not allow for a full and fair public participatory process. Further, we contend that EC has failed

Monsanto

Monsanto and Genetic Modification in South Africa Facts For South African Consumers – Feb 2006
African Centre for Biosafety

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Factsheet: Who Benefits From Gm Crops? Monsanto and the Corporatedriven Genetically Modified Crop Revolution- Jan 2006
Friends of the Earth International

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A Profile Of Monsanto In South Africa – Apr 2005
Mariam Mayet

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A glimpse through the crack in the door: South Africa’s permitting system for GMOs

During 2004, the African Centre for Biosafety (ACB) spent a considerable amount of time monitoring the South African permitting system for genetically modified organisms (GMOs). In the course of its work, it lodged comprehensive objections to numerous applications for the import, marketing and field- testing of GMOs.
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Bt-Maize GA21 / Syngenta

SUBMISSION OF OBJECTIONS BY THE AFRICAN CENTRE FOR BIOSAFETY (ACB)

ObjectionsSyngentaGA21.pdf Objections To The Application Made By Syngenta Seedco In Respect Of Event Ga21 To The National Department Of Agriculture, South Africa
Mariam Mayet and Shenaz Moola, 13 September 2004

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OVERVIEW
SCIENTIFIC OBJECTIONS

A scientific assessment was made of the available information. The main findings are:

  • A full assessment of the scientific data could not be made because of the designation of sections of the application as Confidential Business Information
  • Genetic modification by the application of recombinant DNA technology is characterised by scientific uncertainty. This stems from several factors including the inherent imprecision of currently employed recombinant DNA techniques, the use of powerful promoter sequences in genetic constructs and the generation, as a result of genetic modification, of novel proteins to which humans and animals have never previously been exposed
  • The molecular characterisation information provided by the notifier indicates several irregularities including open reading frames and a truncated constructs which could give rise to unintended gene effects
  • The transfer of the herbicide-tolerant trait to weeds could result in increased herbicide application. The potential for economically important weeds developing herbicide tolerance is a cause for concern
  • Glyphosate use

Monsanto Nk603 X Mon863x Mon810

Objection To The Application By Monsanto For Commodity Clearance Of Its GM Maize Varieties Nk603 X Mon863x Mon810 to The National Department Of Agriculture, South Africa prepared by the African Centre For Biosafety

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August 2006

SUPPORTED BY: Bishop Geoff, Southern African Faith Communities’ Environmental Institute; South African Freeze Alliance on Genetic Engineering; Earthlife Africa Ethekwini branch; GRAIN; SEED Trust; Ekogaia Foundation; Safe Food Coalition.
INTRODUCTION

The African Centre for Biosafety (?ACB?) has already submitted its objections to Monsanto‘s application for commodity clearance in respect of its genetically modified (GM) maize 863 and 863 x MON 810. It has also objected to a commodity clearance application by Pioneer Hi-Bred in respect of GM maize 59122X NK 603, as well Dow Agrosciences’ application for commodity clearance of triple stacked GM maize 1507 x 59122 X NK 603. The scientific and legal concerns raised in these objections are pertinent to the current GM maize application brought before the Exco by Monsanto.

The current application by Monsanto will join the applications to which the ACB has objected to (above), and form part of those commodity clearance applications on hold until the outcome of a study being

BT-Maize MON863 and MON863 X MON810 / Monsanto

SUBMISSION OF OBJECTIONS BY THE AFRICAN CENTRE FOR BIOSAFETY (ACB)
  • Objections to the Application Made by Monsanto South Africa for a Commodity Import Permit of Grain for Feed and Food Purposes that may Contain Maize Grains Derived From Insect-Protected Maize Line Mon863 and Maize Hybrids Mon863 X Mon810
    Mariam Mayet and Shenaz Moola, August 2004
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  • CoverLetter_Mon830X810.pdf Cover Letter to the Registrar
    August 2004
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OVERVIEW
SCIENTIFIC OBJECTIONS

A scientific assessment was made of the available information. The main findings of this assessment, which are discussed in greater detail later in the document, are:

  • A full assessment of the scientific data could not be made because of the designation of large sections of this data as Confidential Business Information
  • The molecular characterisation information provided by the notifier indicates several irregularities including open reading frames, a missing stop codon and truncated constructs which could give rise to unintended gene effects
  • There is evidence of structural instability arising out of the use of the 35S CaMV promoter and there is a call for the discontinuation of the use of this genetic element in the development of transgenic plants
  • The protocols for assessing gene expression in transgenic plants are

SA biosafety regulators in bed with industry on GM potatoes?

The South African government has approved a United States funded project that will soon see genetically engineered potatoes sprouting in six secret locations in African soil. Similar potatoes were first grown in the United States but were withdrawn from the market due to consumer resistance.

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BT-Cotton COT200-Cry1Ab, RRCotton, (Syngenta)

  • Bt-Cotton COT200-Cry1Ab / Syngenta
  • Bt-Cotton COT102-Cry1Ab / Syngenta
  • RoundupReady-Cotton / Syngenta
SUBMISSION OF OBJECTIONS BY THE AFRICAN CENTRE FOR BIOSAFETY (ACB)
Objections to the Application made by Syngenta South Africa in Respect of the Following Events to the National Department of Agriculture, South Africa.

Mariam Mayet and Shenaz Moola, July 2004

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SYNOPSIS – AFRICAN CENTRE FOR BIOSAFETY
1. Provision of false and misleading information material to the approvals sought

The notifier claims that there are no wild relatives of cotton in South Africa (5.5 of the application). It has come to our attention that this is not the case and we have a concern that we have been misled by the notifier’s claims in this regard. There are about 39 species of Gossypium. They are found worldwide in the tropics and warm temperate regions with several species cultivated. There are three species in southern Africa, occurring in northern Namibia, Northern Botswana, Northern Province, Mpumulanga, Swaziland and KwaZulu-Natal. These three species of Gossypium are Gossypium anomalum subsp. anomalum which occurs in Namibia, Gossypium herbaceum subsp africanum which occurs in Namibia, Botswana, Limpopo, Mocambique, Swaziland and KwaZulu-Natal and Gossypium triphyllum which occurs in Namibia and Botswana. According to Cotton