The African Centre for Biodiversity (ACB) welcomes you to our website. We are a research and advocacy organisation working towards food sovereignty and agro-ecology in Africa, with a focus on biosafety, seed systems and agricultural biodiversity. The organisation is committed to dismantling inequalities and resisting corporate-industrial expansion in Africa's food and agriculture systems.

Collage drawing of women farmers preparing food and sowing as well as a field and different vegetables.

Alternatives to FISP: Farm Input Subsidy Programmes in Africa

Video

In August 2018, the Rural Women’s Assembly (RWA) and the African Centre for Biodiversity (ACB) hosted a speak-out for SADC smallholder farmers in Windhoek, Namibia, on Farm Input Subsidy Programmes (FISPs).

FISPs are government agricultural programmes that promote the use of Green Revolution inputs produced by multinational corporations. These top-down packages have proven to be problematic for farmers on the ground.

Experiences of FISP: Farm Input Subsidy Programmes in Africa

Video

In August 2018, the Rural Women’s Assembly (RWA) and the African Centre for Biodiversity (ACB) hosted a speak-out for SADC smallholder farmers in Windhoek, Namibia, on Farm Input Subsidy Programmes (FISPs).

FISPs are government agricultural programmes that promote the use of Green Revolution inputs produced by multinational corporations. Farmers were not properly consulted about their introduction and felt powerless to refuse them. They were also led to believe that FISPs would make inputs cheaper and improve soil fertility.

PRESS RELEASE: East African Farmer & Civil Society Organisations Criticise EAC Seed Bill – demand transparency, participation and inclusion of farmers’ rights

Press release

Arusha, Tanzania, 11th March 2019

We, East African farmer and civil society organisations, met in Arusha on 5th – 6th March 2019, to deliberate on the East African Community (EAC) Seed and Plant Varieties Bill 2018 and its implications for smallholder farmers and their seed systems. The rationale given for the Bill is that this will create a conducive environment for improving regional availability of seed and planting materials. However, we are convinced that this proposed law will displace local seed systems, further entrench inequalities and corporate capture of food and seed systems, and marginalise the rural poor, especially women. We therefore demand that policymakers ensure transparency, public consultation and the inclusion of farmers’ rights to save, reuse, share, exchange and sell all seed in their seed and farming systems.