The African Centre for Biodiversity (ACB) welcomes you to our website. We are a research and advocacy organisation working towards food sovereignty and agro-ecology in Africa, with a focus on biosafety, seed systems and agricultural biodiversity. The organisation is committed to dismantling inequalities and resisting corporate-industrial expansion in Africa's food and agriculture systems.

Collage drawing of women farmers preparing food and sowing as well as a field and different vegetables.

Neoliberals capture South African smallholder farmer support policy

Blog

Ideological and factional divisions and contradictions between neoliberals, ‘patrons’ and progressives have manifested in South Africa’s smallholder farmer support policy. This was evident at a national stakeholder consultation held by the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF) in April 2019.

The policy is meant to support marginalised producers. But it has been thoroughly captured by neoliberals under the banner of the National Development Plan (NDP). The Agricultural Policy Action Plan (APAP) – which is based on the NDP – lists focus crops and products defined by commercial potential, with emphasis on global competitiveness, export markets, value chain integration, and public-private partnerships. In this framework, state and capital work closely to reproduce capital-intensive production models.

Input Subsidies in Mozambique: the future of peasant farmers and their seed systems

Report

In this report, the African Centre for Biodiversity outlines and assesses input subsidy programmes in Mozambique, as part of the larger agriculture policy landscape, and the impact this has had on the agricultural sector, particularly on smallholder farmers.

In Mozambique, peasant farmers feed the country mostly using their own seed. Yet the majority of (donor-funded) government initiatives are driven externally, either in the form of relief programmes or export-oriented commercialisation and value chain integration.

Farmers in Mozambique face a range of environmental and economic risks that are compounded by climate change.  Drought and flooding are the largest agricultural risks.

Gene drive organisms: What Africa should know about actors, motives and threats to biodiversity and food systems

Briefing paper

The African Centre for Biodiversity (ACB) has produced a briefing paper in regard to a new and controversial genetic engineering (GE) technology to produce gene drive organisms (GDOs). These GDOs have been specifically designed to spread an engineered, ‘modified’ genetic trait such as sterility, with the potential to eradicate entire wildlife populations and even species. The briefing is also available in French.