The African Centre for Biodiversity (ACB) welcomes you to our website. We are a research and advocacy organisation working towards food sovereignty and agro-ecology in Africa, with a focus on biosafety, seed systems and agricultural biodiversity. The organisation is committed to dismantling inequalities and resisting corporate-industrial expansion in Africa's food and agriculture systems.

Collage drawing of women farmers preparing food and sowing as well as a field and different vegetables.

Input Subsidies in Mozambique: the future of peasant farmers and their seed systems

Report

In this report, the African Centre for Biodiversity outlines and assesses input subsidy programmes in Mozambique, as part of the larger agriculture policy landscape, and the impact this has had on the agricultural sector, particularly on smallholder farmers.

In Mozambique, peasant farmers feed the country mostly using their own seed. Yet the majority of (donor-funded) government initiatives are driven externally, either in the form of relief programmes or export-oriented commercialisation and value chain integration.

Farmers in Mozambique face a range of environmental and economic risks that are compounded by climate change.  Drought and flooding are the largest agricultural risks.

Gene drive organisms: What Africa should know about actors, motives and threats to biodiversity and food systems

Briefing paper

The African Centre for Biodiversity (ACB) has produced a briefing paper in regard to a new and controversial genetic engineering (GE) technology to produce gene drive organisms (GDOs). These GDOs have been specifically designed to spread an engineered, ‘modified’ genetic trait such as sterility, with the potential to eradicate entire wildlife populations and even species. The briefing is also available in French.

STOP RISKY GM MOSQUITO RELEASES – WE HAVE THE RIGHT TO SAY NO

Open Letter

We, the undersigned civil society organisations in Africa, hereby call upon the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the Target Malaria project to stop the intended release of 10 000 genetically modified (GM) “male sterile” mosquitoes in Burkina Faso, as the release poses unacceptable risks to human beings and the environment.

We note with grave concern that African citizens are being exposed to life threatening health risks, through questionable technology involving the release of GM mosquitoes. We are even more alarmed to learn that, by Target Malaria’s own admission, there are no advantages expected from the initial proposed GM mosquito release, as it is intended only for training purposes and not expected to deliver any benefits for malaria control in Burkina Faso.