Factsheets

Factsheets

Agroecology versus Industrial Agriculture

These graphics, captured in an easy to read and visually informative manner, illustrate the stark difference of practices and values between the current industrial food system and agroecological food systems.

It is clear that the industrial model is unsustainable, lacks nutrition, destroys livelihoods, and is an unsuitable model as we move into an increasingly uncertain future.

We need radical reforms in agriculture and food systems, which are ecologically and socially just, and ensure safe, healthy, and nutritional food for current and future generations.

Afrikaans | English | isi-Xhosa | isi-Zulu | Sesotho

Who Owns Our Food Systems… Information sheets in English, Afrikaans, Sotho and Zulu

Click on a heading below and download an A4 information sheet in your preferred language.

GM-Health

Is our PAP safe?

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Price-Fixing

Fixing the price of Food. SA’s poor bear the brunt of rising food costs while big food companies’ profits rise.

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Small-scale-farmers

Small-Scale Farmers and the maize value chain. Our government’s vision for agrarian reform is for small-scale farmers to enter the commercial market. This is a pipe dream!

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Value-Chain

Who Owns our Maize? In South Africa a handful of very powerful corporations control how and what we eat!

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GM-Health

Is ons PAP veilig?

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GM-Testing

Geneties gewysigde pap: Geen keuse vir Suid-Afrikaners.

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Price-Fixing

Prys vasstelling van voedsel. Suid-Afrika se armes ly onder die stygende voedselpryse, terwyl groot voedselmaatskappye se winste styg.

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Small-scale-farmers

Kleinskaalse boere en die mielie-waardeketting. Ons regering se visie vir landbouhervorming, is dat kleinskaalse boere die kommerersi?le mark betree. Dit is ‘n hersenskim!

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Value-Chain

Aan wie behoort ons mielies? Die reis wat mielies vanaf die boer se plaas tot by dies silo en dan na die meul en eindelik tot by die supermark onderneem, word die ‘mielie waardeketting’, genoem.

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GM-Health

Na PAPA ya rona e bolokehile?

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GM-Testing

Papa ya

WHO OWNS OUR FOOD SYSTEM?

It is a matter of urgency that we break up these cartels that have South African consumers, especially the poorest of the poor, in a vice grip through control of our two staple foods ? maize and bread.

South Africans eat about 28 billion loaves of bread and, on average, about 100kg of maize and maize-related products each year ? wheat and maize are the country?s staple foods. Only a few companies control the wheat and maize value chains ? the journey taken from the farmer?s fields to the mill, the supermarket shelf and then to our tables each day.

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Suid-Afrikaners eet jaarliks sowat 28 biljoen brode en gemiddeld verbruik elke persoon jaarliks 100kg mielies en mielie-verwante produkte ? koring en mielies is die land se stapelvoedsel. Die koring- en mielie waardekettings word deur slegs ?n paar maatskappye beheer. Dit sluit die voorsieningsketting vanaf die boer se lande na die meule, die winkelrak tot by ons tafels elke dag, in.

Lees verder

Abantu baseNingizimu Afrika badla cishe amalofu esinkwa angu 28bhiliyoni, kanti ukulinganisa, cishe ngu 100kg wombila kanye nemikhiqizo eyenziwe ngempumphu kunyaka nonyaka ? ukolo kanye nombila ukudla okudliwa kakhulu kwemihla ngemihla ezweni. Zinkampani ezimbalwa ezilawula

International Regulation

International law governing GMOs

 
Genetic engineering (GE), also called genetic modification (GM), is not just a modern version of the
natural breeding that we know and have practised for many thousands of years. It is a new and
totally artificial way of creating living organisms that can never occur in nature. These genetically
modified organisms (GMOs) have a life of their own; once released, they will spread and multiply
and cannot be recalled. Many scientists believe that the way of producing these GM foods is so new
that we can?t be sure of the long term impacts on our health and the environment. We don?t yet
fully understand the potential risks of growing and eating these GM foods. However, scientists have
already begun to see early warning signals of serious health and environmental problems. Therefore,
special laws are required to regulate GMOs.

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GM Soya in SA

Genetically modified soya in South Africa

 
It might surprise you to learn that there are very few kinds of GM crops growing in the world today ? the four major crops are soya, maize, cotton and canola. The most commonly grown GM crop is soya ? it makes up almost half of all GM crops grown around the world. This soya has been genetically engineered to survive applications of herbicides (weedkiller), the most common one being Monsanto?s ?RoundUp?. South Africa is a tiny player on the world soya market, but has completely adopted GM soya production.

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GM Maize in SA

Genetically modified maize in South Africa

 
Genetically modified (GM) maize is big business globally. In 2011, farmers grew about 51 million hectares of GM maize.
Most of this production happened in the United States where the majority of GM crops are being grown. There are just four major GM crops grown in the world today and maize and soya make up the bulk of these. We have been told that GM crops are the answer to world hunger but the majority of this maize is not grown for food. It is grown mostly for animal feed and shipped around the world by massive agricultural commodity trading companies such as Cargill, Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) and Bunge. These grain trading companies are some of the wealthiest corporations in the world. In 2010, these three companies together earned about 200 billion US dollars from trading maize, soya and other grain crops on the global market. Makes you wonder, do GM crops feed hungry people or hungry corporations?

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GM Cotton in SA

Genetically modified cotton in South Africa

 
The biotechnology industry has really tried to win small-scale farmers over to genetically modified (GM) cotton, especially in Africa and Asia. Getting cotton approved in a country is a good way for the industry to pave the way for the entry of the GM food crops. It is estimated that farmers around the globe planted about 21 million hectares of GM cotton in 2011. According to the biotechnology industry, about 15 million peasant farmers planted pest resistant Bt cotton last year, mostly in India. They also claim that South Africa is one of the countries in the global South where cotton has ?made a significant contribution? to improving smallholder livelihoods. They say that the adoption of GM cotton by small-scale farmers is a success story, however reports from the ground tell of social upheaval, heavy debts, poor quality produce and environmental and health problems.

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SA Labelling

Labelling of genetically modified food in South Africa

 
Food labelling ? your ?right to know? It is a consumers? right to know what is in their food and to make informed choices about what they
eat. Yet, South Africans have been eating genetically modified (GM) food for more than a decade without their knowledge or consent. The producers of genetically modified (GM) foods say that these foods are perfectly safe, but many scientists disagree and consumers do not want to take the risk. About 40 countries in the world label GM foods or have banned them altogether.

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Who benefits?

Genetically modified crops in South Africa: a failure for farmers

 
Anybody who has heard of genetically modified (GM) crops has also heard that we in Africa must accept them or face starvation. The primary message is that GM crops have been developed for the poor and hungry. This is a highly emotional argument put forward by the companies that develop GM technology. However, when we look into the past two decades of GM crop production we find that GM technology benefits the developers of GM technology, while farmers and society pay the price.

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GM Myths

What you should know about GM crops

 
Myths are based on false promises and deception, against actual reality and genuine concerns. The biotechnology industry has spread a lot of myths about what GMOs can do. These are not based on fact and have been shown to be false in reality.

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