Input Subsidies in Mozambique: the future of peasant farmers and their seed systems

Report

In this report, the African Centre for Biodiversity outlines and assesses input subsidy programmes in Mozambique, as part of the larger agriculture policy landscape, and the impact this has had on the agricultural sector, particularly on smallholder farmers.

In Mozambique, peasant farmers feed the country mostly using their own seed. Yet the majority of (donor-funded) government initiatives are driven externally, either in the form of relief programmes or export-oriented commercialisation and value chain integration.

Farmers in Mozambique face a range of environmental and economic risks that are compounded by climate change.  Drought and flooding are the largest agricultural risks.

South Africa’s new seed and PVP Acts undermine farmers’ rights and entrench corporate capture, control and domination

Press release

Press Release from the African Centre for Biodiversity (ACB)

23 April 2019, Johannesburg, South Africa

 

The highly problematic new Plant Improvement Act 2018 (PIA) and Plant Breeder’s Rights Act 2018 (PBR), approved by Parliament last year, have been signed into law this March by the President, replacing the 1976 versions. Regulations are currently being drafted to bring these Acts fully into effect. The framing and scope of these Acts form part of the architecture that reinforces historically unequal seed, agricultural and food systems, and strengthens the power of large-scale commercial breeders. Thus, we have called for specific exemptions to protect and support the rights of smallholder farmers and their farming systems.